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Created by Pavlos Kountouriotis 2009-11

Regarding the Pain of Others - A Performance Lecture
Regarding the Pain of Others- A Performance Lecture (2008)

 

Duration: 35 minutes

Concept:
I AM REAL AND YOU WILL LOVE ME AND EVERYONE IN THIS FUCKING ROOM WILL REMEMBER ME.
This work-in- progress in its entirety draws from the theories by Susan Sontag on the reality and performativity of documentation. Although Susan Sontag explicitly speaks about photography I try to enlarge the notion what that document might.
Therefore two parallel universes were created that coexist and complement each other. The one is the choreography of a fictitious past moment breaking the boundaries between now, before and later and the other is the space of a live documentation of time.
I chose for the medium of performance lecture, which, through its selfreflective, mirroring character can serve as a caption to the past, present and future. A thorough investigation on the stereotypes of the mode of a performance lecture has allowed me to give a comment on the authenticity and reality that this reemerging choreographic style builds by framing and staging only what the choreographer has chosen to think about or declares that he has chosen to thing about. The piece is thus constructing a reference not only to itself, documenting itself in museological installation, but also makes references to other performance lectures.
Click here for a more detailed analysis of the concept of this solo.

Performers: Pavlos Kountouriotis

Special Thanks to : Aaron Paterson, Martin Hargreaves

For more detailed information about the project you may want to visit the blog where the whole creative process is also documented. Please click here.

Presented: London (2008, Laban), Porto (2008, Maus Habitos), Porto (2008, Sweet and Tender Fragmens of Experience), Tilburg (2009, Festival Incubator), 2010 (Greenroom, Manchester)

Click here for a review by Ivy Hakes